2013

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Text September 18, 2019
3531 Words
Video June 8, 2019
2' 0"
Video June 8, 2019

Predicament Koans

John Tarrant

John Tarrant Roshi leads a conversation on koans that reveal themselves through predicaments. “I might find myself imprisoned in a crypt, or hanging from a branch by my teeth. Or trapped in a job or relationship I think I cannot escape.” A lively exploration follows. July 11, 2013.

42' 52"
Video June 7, 2019

The Ear Bug

David Weinstein

David’s dharma talk during Bare Bones retreat about falling down a well. “How does the fully enlightened person fall into a well?” The koan brought to mind an old Maquire sisters song that goes, “Wella, Wella, Wella waiting for the Bella to go ding dong, ding dong…” We all fall into our own personal wells of suffering. David lends a hand to pull us out by sharing his own well stories.

60' 54"
Misc December 17, 2017
Misc December 17, 2017
Misc December 17, 2017
Misc December 17, 2017

Coral Moon

Allison Atwill

Allison Atwill, “Coral Moon,” 2013. Acrylic on birch panel with silver leaf, 30″ x 40″.

Text November 24, 2017

A Beautiful Mistake

John Tarrant

“We all have the urge to be better people, and behind all our self-improvement there is a profound impulse. Self-improvement is a gateway, the first step in a quest, a clue to a deeper life. The most beautiful form of the beautiful life is inner freedom, the awakening taught in the ancient spiritual traditions.” Published Shambhala Sun Magazine, September 2013.

3374 Words
Text November 24, 2017

Living in the Moment

Allison Atwill

“Good morning. This morning I wanted to talk a little bit about the experience of relying on the moment that we’re in to make itself. . . .” July 2013.

3511 Words
Video July 11, 2017

Zen and Science — What’s Real Magic?

Chris Gaffney

Physicist and Physics professor Chris Gaffney gave a talk in Santa Rosa on a Monday evening in July 2013, and this is what he said about it:

26' 30"
Video July 11, 2017

Each Branch of Coral Holds Up The Moon

John Tarrant

Roshi John Tarrant gives the third of three koans for Bare Bones retreat. The head of the koan is: “What is the sharpest sword or the sword which will cut even the finest piece of hair in two?” The response to the question is, “Each branch of coral holds up the moon.” February 22, 2013.

32' 31"
Video July 11, 2017

How Does A Fully Enlightened Person Fall Into the Well?

John Tarrant

On the second day of retreat, John Tarrant talks about the second koan of the triptych, “How does an enlightened person fall into a well?” How do we as practitioners handle major issues in our lives which cause us to fall into darkness or depression? When things are bleak or difficult, the opportunity is to turn toward our practice and the teachings or our community. January 21, 2013.

29' 49"
Video July 11, 2017

Each Branch of Coral Holds Up the Moon

Allison Atwill

Allison Atwill Sensei describes the making of her amazing art piece inspired by the koan, “Each Branch of Coral Holds Up the Moon.” January 24, 2013.

49' 0"
Video July 6, 2017

The Buffalo and the Lattice Window

John Tarrant

John opens the Harvest Moon retreat at the Angela Center with an ancient Koan about a buffalo passing through a lattice window. “To give an example, it is like a buffalo passing through a window. Its head, horns and four legs have all passed through. Why is it that its tail cannot?” Meditate on the tail and the question of the tail. What is the tail, why could a huge buffalo enter but the tail cannot? October 13, 2013.

Video July 6, 2017

The Question of the Tail

David Weinstein

David Weinstein Roshi continues the conversation during retreat regarding the ancient Koan about the buffalo passing through a lattice window. How can the buffalo get through the lattice window all but the tail? What is it that is difficult for me to let in? Can we be compassionate with ourselves when we find the place on our life where there is a no trespassing sign?

23' 52"
Video July 6, 2017

The True Person of No Rank

John Tarrant

John opens the evening with the koan “The True Person of No Rank.” It goes something like this: “There is a true person of no rank who comes and goes from the portals of your face.” Who is that person of no rank?

Linji was a great teacher and the ancestor of most of the koan lines of Zen and this is a koan of his. It has been used since ancient times as a meditation both for beginners and advanced students.

Probably the best way to work with it is to play with it. Don’t rank how you are doing. Just let it keep you company, like an animal would. You forget about it, but every time you look, there it is! And after a while it doesn’t go away. October 17, 2013.

31' 11"