Setting the Mind to Rest

Description

How do we set the mind at rest in times of war and turbulence? The practice was made in and for times like these. The art of practice is to be at peace in the middle of all the forces: climate change, disaster, war, disease, famine. Jordan MCConnell chants a dharani, a sacred spell to ward off danger and dispel demons. Can’t hurt! February 27, 2022.

Summary

KOAN:

A student comes to Bodhidharma: “Teacher please set my mind to rest.”
Bodhidharma says, “Bring me your mind and I will set it to rest.”
“I have searched for mind and cannot find it.”
“There, I have set it to rest!”

The doomscroll in the mind likes to be busy. The only way to notice your heart is to stop running around waving your arms. The koan reveals the spaciousness at work already.

Whenever you are unhappy, your heart is not at rest.We are all looking for a “thing” and what we find is spaciousness. We are all water falling into water.

The art of practice is to be at peace with all the forces: climate change, disaster, war, disease, famine. The practice was made in and for these times.

My heart is not at rest in these times of war: the intractability of it, the pointlessness. Readings from Tolstoy’s War and Peace, and the ancient Greek Illiad and Odyssey are still relevant today.

Argentinian Alberto Manuel told a story of books that were sent to a library in the Andes during the war, and how the people returned every book but the Iliad because of its vast perspective on conflict, and how it told their story.

Temple musician Jordan McConnell chants the Sho Sai Myo Kichijo Dharani 9 times to ward off danger and to dispel demons. It can’t hurt. The dharanis are not logical in translation, they are sacred sounds. Any sound can awaken us.

Have confidence in the light that is always at work inside you.
—Linji

 

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